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Report: Iran, UN nuclear chief reach inspection deal

'Road map' agreement could boost broader international negotiations over Tehran's nuclear program

The head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and the International Atomic Energy Agency's director, General Yukiya Amano, after their meeting in Tehran on Monday.
ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian state TV reported Monday that a deal for expanded monitoring has been reached in talks with the United Nations' nuclear chief — an agreement that could boost wider international negotiations over Tehran's atomic program.

The report said the deal was struck Monday in talks with the head of the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency, Yukiya Amano.

It is a so-called road map that will give U.N. inspectors a broader reach, including access to a heavy-water reactor under construction and a key uranium mine.

The talks in Tehran came after envoys from Iran and world powers failed over the weekend to reach an accord in Geneva on efforts to ease Western concerns that Iran could one day develop nuclear weapons — an intent that Iran denies.

The talks stalled after French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said there were "still some questions to be addressed." Those negotiations are scheduled to resume next week.

Click for the latest news and analysis on US-Iran talks.

After the meeting, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said it was a "good meeting" and that it was "a very productive three days."

However, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday that the major powers in the Geneva talks were unified on an Iranian nuclear deal but the Iranians were unable to accept it.

Speaking to reporters in Abu Dhabi, Kerry said the major powers were in accord on Saturday when the proposal was presented to the Iranians.

"The French signed off on it. We signed off on it," he said.

But Kerry said Iran was not able to accept the deal "at that particular moment."

He also said Monday that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu "needs to recognize that no agreement" with Iran has been reached and that his opposition to a deal is therefore premature.

"The time to oppose (an agreement) is when you see what it is," Kerry said.

Such a deal would be the first reached between the West and Iran in more than 10 years.  

On Monday the U.K. announced that it plans to re-establish full diplomatic relations with Iran, two years after ties between the countries fell apart after an attack on the British Embassy in Tehran.

Al Jazeera and news services

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